Mgmt 801: Introduction to Research Methodology

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the context and traditions of knowledge generation in the social sciences in general, and academic business research in a business school context in particular. This course will encourage students to transcend the technical details of their respective research paradigms so as to position themselves as business school researchers capable of contributing meaningful knowledge to broader academic, business, and societal audiences. Guided by what it means to have a mindset of intellectual curiosity in the social sciences and business school context, this course will tackle questions such as, what it means to be driven by a scientific curiosity; how do we define or construct knowledge in academic business research and how does one's individual research contribute; what are the norms and traditions of being a valuable contributor of knowledge in academic business research? The goal of this course is to enable students to situate their current and forthcoming acquisition of in-depth skills in their research discipline into the mindset of researchers driven by intellectual curiosity seeking to contribute meaningful knowledge in the context and traditions of academic business research.

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Mgmt 890/990: Econometric Methods

This course covers selected topics in the empirical methods of cross-section and panel data analysis. Various econometric techniques are discussed in workshop format to help students interpret and critically evaluate empirical evidence. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects and application.

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Mgmt 821/921: Capital Markets, Theory and Empirics

This course covers the theory and empirics related to capital markets research and the pricing of assets. Possible topics include characteristics of financial asset returns, tests of market efficiency, asset pricing models, and market microstructure.

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Mgmt 988: Applied Statistics and Econometrics

This course is an introduction to the statistical tools needed to test economic relationships. It is designed so that students can understand empirical research and execute independent research projects of their own. The course starts with a review of statistical inference; next it discusses the general linear regression model, and finishes with some advanced topics. Statistical software packages will be introduced and used throughout the course.

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Mgmt 913: Introduction to Accounting Research - Markets

This course will provide an intensive introduction to principal themes in capital markets research in accounting.

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Mgmt 914: Introduction to Accounting Research - Experimental

This course will provide an intensive introduction to principal themes in experimental behavioral research.

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Mgmt 915: Introduction to Accounting Research - Field

This course will provide an intensive introduction to the principal themes in qualitative methodological research in accounting.

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Mgmt 910: Accounting I - Financial Accounting Research

Elaborating on the themes in Introduction to Accounting Research Markets this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in financial accounting.

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Mgmt 911: Accounting II - Auditing Research

Elaborating on the themes in Introduction to Accounting Research Experimental and Introduction to Accounting Research Field this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in auditing.

or

Mgmt 912: Accounting III - Management Accounting Research

Elaborating on the themes in the Introduction to Accounting Research Experimental and the Introduction to Accounting Research Field this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in management accounting.

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Mgmt 800: Statistics I

Topics in this course may include, but are not limited to, univariate analysis, bivariate analysis, multiple linear regression, and analysis of variance.

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Mgmt 804: Survey Research Method Design

This course will provide students with the foundations of survey (field) research method design. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, sample design, execution, and estimation; alternative sample designs and modes of data collection; the effect of question structure, wording, and context on respondent behaviour; the equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with the survey method.

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MGMT-802: Qualitative Research Method Design

This course will provide students with the foundations of qualitative research techniques. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, observational field research, narratives, case histories, interviewing, principles of action research and grounded theory. The equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with the qualitative methods.

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Mgmt 882/982: Economics of Organizations

This course discusses elements of the economics of organizational design and decision processes. Using concepts and techniques from applied microeconomics, it provides an analysis of organizational form, structure, and boundaries. Examples are drawn from the literature to illustrate the theoretical concepts and to demonstrate how they can be used to predict organizational performance and aid in changing organizations effectively.

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Econ 810: Microeconomic Theory

This course provides an in depth review of theories of demand, production, general equilibrium, market failures and welfare economics. In addition, selected topics in decision theory and game theory will be covered.

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MGMT-885/985: Managerial Economics and Policy Seminar

This is a seminar course in which recent publications and studies will be used to highlight various key issues in managerial economics and policy. The specific topics covered may vary from year to year but will be representative of the major areas in which economics informs managerial decision-making.

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Econ 815: Macroeconomic Theory

The first half of this course discusses the computation of aggregate variables and introduces students to dynamic models of long-run growth: the Solow model, the neoclassical growth model, overlapping generations models, and endogenous growth models. These are used to study long-run policy issues and the determinants of cross-country differences in per capita income and growth. The second half of the course introduces the student to real business cycle models and to the micro-foundations of models of nominal rigidities and non-market clearing. These are used to study the nature of short-run fluctuations and to evaluate macroeconomic policies related to stabilization, inflation, unemployment and the public debt.

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Mgmt 822/922: Corporate Finance, Theory and Empirics

This course will develop an overall perspective of corporate financial decisions through an integrated coverage of the most important topics of corporate finance. Topics may include theory of the firm, capital structure, dividend policy, corporate governance, and corporate restructuring.

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Econ 852: Quantitative Methods

A first course in econometrics at the graduate level. Students are expected to have had at least one econometrics course at the undergraduate level, and to be familiar with matrix algebra and elementary statistics. A broad range of econometric models will be covered.

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Mgmt 803: Experimental Research Method Design

This course will teach the fundamentals of experimental design for the study of human behaviour including, but not limited to, experimental design considerations; assessment of reliability and validity; the equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with experimental design.

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Mgmt 870/970: Foundations of MIS I

This course begins to survey the major research areas in the field, including the design, implementation, use, and management of information systems within organizations. Its purpose is to expose students to the breadth of the field, by analyzing both the classic and current literature. For each area, we will examine the predominant theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, and analytical techniques.

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Mgmt 871/971: Foundations of MIS II

This course continues with the survey of major research areas begun in MGMT870. Again, for each area, we will examine the predominant theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, and analytical techniques. An emphasis will be placed on students developing their own research expertise and plans: students will learn how to design, conduct, evaluate, and present good research in the MIS area.

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MGMT-972 Advanced Topics in the Design, Development and Implementation of Information Systems

This course examines the development of information systems from the organizational, team and individual perspectives. Proprietary, inter-organizational and open domains of the development of business applications and IT architecture are covered. Topics include IS development practices, IS project management, IS maintenance, and IS sourcing with a focus on how individual characteristics, team dynamics, and organizational factors influence information systems design, development and implementation.

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Mgmt 973: Advanced Topics in Management Support Systems

This course examines research on management support systems. Management support systems is a major stream in information systems research covering such topics as decision support systems, group support systems, recommender systems for management, systems to support virtual teams, and knowledge management systems. The course explores the nature, role, and impacts of these systems on individuals and groups in the organization. Research in this area is diverse, covering a variety of theoretical bases, research methods, and reference discipline perspectives.

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MGMT-974* Advanced Topics in the Evaluation of Information Systems

This course examines current research on the impact of information technology on individual, group and organizational performance. It focuses on developing an understanding of how information technology (IT) changes both the processes and outcomes of work within an organization. At the individual level, topics include the impact of IT on employee work and productivity, the determinants of IT usage, and the influence of IT on decision-making. At the group level, topics include the influence of IT on group communication, social processes, and productivity in face-to-face and distributed settings. At the organizational level, topics involving the evaluation of IT investments and their impact on firm performance are examined. A variety of research perspectives drawing on methods from psychology, organization theory, strategy, economics, sociology and other disciplines are examined.

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Mgmt 975: Special Topics in MIS

Specialized topics in MIS research will be covered. The subject matter may vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and faculty.

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Mgmt 976: Emerging Topics in MIS

Emerging topics in MIS research will be covered. The subject matter may vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and faculty.

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Mgmt 860/960: Deterministic Operations Research Models

This course reviews and extends deterministic operations research model formulation, solution, and applications. Topics may include linear, non-linear, and integer programming, dynamic programming, spreadsheet modelling, network and transportation models, and project management models.

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Mgmt 962: Stochastic Processes and Applications

This course provides a review of probability models and introduction to applied stochastic processes that are important in business settings. Topics may include Poisson processes, Markov chains, birth and death processes, random walk problems, elementary renewal theory, general; Markov processes, Brownian motion, and queuing theory..

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Mgmt 861/961: Probabilistic Operations Research Models

This course reviews the formulation, solution, and application of a range of probabilistic modelling techniques. Topics may include inventory models, queueing, simulation, decision analysis, Markov models, forecasting, and stochastic dynamic programming.

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Mgmt 965: Analysis of Supply Chains

In this course, we will explore modern analytical approaches to optimization in production and supply chain systems. Topics may include production and inventory control, process control, location analysis, and analysis of supply chains, including game-theoretic approaches.

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Mgmt 840/940: Marketing Strategy & Management I

The Marketing Strategy and Management I and II seminars survey theories and frameworks associated with practice of marketing as seen through the eyes of academic researchers. Course readings focus on topics related to marketing strategy and marketing management. Marketing strategy consists of the knowledge, concepts and processes that allow firms to evolve and survive in a competitive environment including, the analysis of markets, the allocation of resources for the creation of superior customer value and the creation of a competitive advantage. Marketing management consists of those decision that translate strategic goals into market-based actions typically through implementing various elements of the marketing mix. In addition to the embodiment of a market/customer focus and the understanding and management of key relationships, the application of marketing strategy also ensures that an organization has the structure and processes that allow it to deliver superior benefits and respond in an appropriate and timely manner to change.

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Mgmt 842/942: Consumer Behaviour I

This course seeks to enhance students' appreciation of the interdisciplinary and varied methodological nature of the field by providing an overview of issues concerned with "consumption," in a broad sense, as well as individual level consumer behavior, information processing and consumer decision-making. Topics include sociological and cultural influences on consumers, influences on how consumers interpret and respond to marketing phenomena, and psychological and psycho-social influences on consumer choice and decision processes.

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Mgmt 844/944: Marketing Topics I

Each year, a series of Marketing Topics courses will be offered that allow students to apply the foundational concepts they have learned in the Marketing Strategy and Consumer Behaviour courses to particular areas of specialization. Here is a sample of some of the Marketing Topics courses:

Mgmt 844/944 - Marketing and Society: This course will expose students to social, economic, environmental, political, and legal issues relevant to the study of markets and marketing activities, with particular emphasis placed on issues at the intersection of marketing, policy, and societal welfare. Course readings are drawn from marketing and related fields on topics broadly labeled as having to do with marketing and society issues, including public policy and marketing, transformative consumer research, social marketing, macromarketing, and sustainable consumption.

Mgmt 945 and Mgmt 948 - Quantitative Models for Marketing (QMM) I and II: The seminars, QMM‐I and QMM‐II, are particularly valuable for M.Sc. and Ph.D. students in Marketing or related disciplines (e.g. Business Economics, Operations Management) who are interested in model building and business analytics. The courses are designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM‐I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate‐level models while QMM‐II focuses on consumer‐level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM‐I and II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual‐level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

Mgmt 946 - Consumer Culture Theory: This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

Mgmt 947 - Advances in Marketing: Other topics courses will be available.

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Mgmt 945: Marketing Topics II

Each year, a series of Marketing Topics courses will be offered that allow students to apply the foundational concepts they have learned in the Marketing Strategy and Consumer Behaviour courses to particular areas of specialization. Here is a sample of some of the Marketing Topics courses:

Mgmt 844/944 - Marketing and Society: This course will expose students to social, economic, environmental, political, and legal issues relevant to the study of markets and marketing activities, with particular emphasis placed on issues at the intersection of marketing, policy, and societal welfare. Course readings are drawn from marketing and related fields on topics broadly labeled as having to do with marketing and society issues, including public policy and marketing, transformative consumer research, social marketing, macromarketing, and sustainable consumption.

Mgmt 945 and Mgmt 948 - Quantitative Models for Marketing (QMM) I and II: The seminars, QMM‐I and QMM‐II, are particularly valuable for M.Sc. and Ph.D. students in Marketing or related disciplines (e.g. Business Economics, Operations Management) who are interested in model building and business analytics. The courses are designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM‐I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate‐level models while QMM‐II focuses on consumer‐level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM‐I and II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual‐level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

Mgmt 946 - Consumer Culture Theory: This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

Mgmt 947 - Advances in Marketing: Other topics courses will be available.

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Mgmt 850/950: Foundations of Research in Organizational Behaviour

The purpose of the course is to introduce you to the process of theory building in the field of organizational behaviour. The course examines several prominent theories in the field and explores recent evidence that assesses central claims made by the theory. The course also provides opportunities to develop skills in theory building.

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MGMT 953: Seminar in Meso-Organizational Behaviour

This course introduces students to meso organizational behavior, which is concerned with the study of organizational phenomena that occur across more than one level of analysis (e.g., individual, group, organizational, national). Students will learn about multilevel theory and methodologies, with an emphasis on the emergence and functioning of collective constructs. The course will also provide coverage of numerous organizational behaviour topics that span levels, which may include person-environment fit, group and organizational climates, group diversity, group processes and performance, socially shared cognition, emotional contagion, and leaders' influence in social collectives.

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MGMT-851/951: Seminar in Micro-Organizational Behaviour

The aim of this course is to examine the individual in the organization. Topics include work stress and workplace safety, organizational commitment, trust in management, organizational justice, aggression and violence in organizations, absenteeism, attendance and withdrawal from the organization, motivation, leadership, part-time employment, young workers, and job design.

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Mgmt 805*/3: History of Strategic Thought

This course provides a foundation in strategy and organizations by focusing on classic readings and approaches to the field of strategic management. The principal objective is to acquaint students with dominant ideas and a historical context for understanding the evolution of the field. The aim of the course will be to examine a number of perspectives, consider the strengths and weaknesses of each, and to look at the comparative ability of these models to explain a variety of organizational phenomena.

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Mgmt 806*/3: Strategy Process

This course provides an introduction to research on the process and practice of strategy making. The objective of the course is to survey major theoretical debates and empirical works that have considered the strategy making process from different conceptual perspectives and levels of analysis. Topics covered include the routines and tools supporting strategy practice, strategy emergence, strategy implementation and evolution, sensemaking and enactment of strategic change, strategy diffusion across organizations, and institutional and environmental influences on strategy making.

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Mgmt 907*/3: Contemporary Issues in Strategic Management

This course provides a comprehensive overview of theoretical models and empirical studies that address the fundamental questions in strategic management research: Why do firms perform differently? Why are firms different? How do firms behave? What are firms’ optimal boundaries? Each class will cover a different research stream within the strategic management field such as resource-based theory, knowledge-based view, behavioral theory of the firm, competitive dynamics, dynamic capabilities, alliance portfolios and networks, top management teams, real options theory and diversification strategy. Both seminal and more recent theoretical and empirical research will be discussed. The aim is to help students develop a mental model of the literature and to recognize interrelationships between different research streams. This course is intended for graduate students interested in conducting research in strategic management or related fields.

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MGMT-952: Advanced Topics in Organization Theory

This course provides a comprehensive overview of theoretical models and empirical studies that address the fundamental questions in strategic management research: Why do firms perform differently? Why are firms different? How do firms behave? What are firms' optimal boundaries? Each class will cover a different research stream within the strategic management field such as resource-based theory, knowledge-based view, behavioral theory of the firm, competitive dynamics, dynamic capabilities, alliance portfolios and networks, top management teams, real options theory and diversification strategy. Both seminal and more recent theoretical and empirical research will be discussed. The aim is to help students develop a mental model of the literature and to recognize interrelationships between different research streams. This course is intended for graduate students interested in conducting research in strategic management or related fields

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MGMT-906*/3: Corporate Strategy Dynamics

This course examines corporate strategy dynamics, studying how firms scan the environment, gather information, and deal with information asymmetries; how firms perceive, interpret, and respond to environmental threats; and how firms transact under conditions of market failure. These dynamics will be studied in the context of organizational growth, acquisitions, reconfiguration, spatial evolution, strategic alliances, and divestiture. The course is expected to provide opportunities for students to develop and present research ideas in an emerging field. In addition, the course aims to contribute to student research efforts by (i) examining an emerging synthesis of existing theories that has application across domains, including innovation, CSR, governance, strategy process, international business, emerging market strategy, and institutional theory, and (ii) exploring the research process in complex empirical contexts.

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MGMT-905*/3: Entrepreneurship and Innovation

This seminar introduces you to theoretical and empirical literature in the domain of entrepreneurship. Research in entrepreneurship draws on a range of other disciplines. In this course the core discipline most frequently drawn upon in the assigned readings will be sociology (and its sub-domains of economic sociology and institutional theory) followed by economics. Theories drawn from psychology will be much less prominent. Following an introduction to entrepreneurship as a distinct field of research, each week will focus on a different stage of the entrepreneurial life cycle of a firm. Topics may include opportunity recognition, the process of innovation, institutional influences on entrepreneurship, the role that networks and social capital play in the development and growth of firms, corporate entrepreneurship, and entrepreneurial exit.

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MGMT 923: Financial Economics

The objective of this course is to provide students with the rigorous theoretical foundations of modern financial economics. The course will cover the central themes of modern finance including individual investment decisions under uncertainty, stochastic dominance, mean variance analysis, arbitrage pricing theory, capital market equilibrium and asset valuation, risk neutral valuation, and incomplete markets. It will give a quick introduction to Ito calculus and its applications to derivative pricing, including options, futures, interest rates, and credit risks. After completing this course, the students should acquire a clear understanding of the major theoretical results concerning individuals’ consumption and portfolio decisions under uncertainty and their implications for the valuation of securities.

Prerequisites: Calculus, matrix algebra, and probability

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MGMT 894/994: Foundations of International Business

While the field of international business is sometimes divided into macro issues (e.g., foreign direct investment drivers, political risk, etc.) and meso/micro issues (e.g., organizational and individual behaviours in international markets), this course will provide an overview of each of these areas by sampling an array of readings and perspectives that collectively describe the domain of international business. The basic goal of this seminar is to prepare PhD students in International Business by providing a broad overview of the international business field, key theories, trends, phenomena, and the methods that are used to study them. We will also examine how the study of international business connects with other management disciplines—strategy and organizational behaviour in particular—as well as with other academic areas such as economics, political science and international development studies. Cross-national and cross-cultural research will be considered throughout the course and topics of special interest, including alliances, knowledge management, and networks will be included.

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MGMT 895/995: Seminar in Cross-Cultural Management

The course will cover the key current topics in the international management field. In doing so, students will study the major terms, constructs and theories, as well as examine the key patterns and major debates, in the cross-cultural management literature. While theory, methodology, and application will be critically examined, a chief objective of the course is to develop research ideas that should lead to scholarly contribution. Students will further their understanding of national culture by examining the latest developments in the cultural intelligence and cross-cultural competencies literature. Topics on cross-cultural interaction, such as communication, negotiation, and the development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships across cultures, will also be studied. Furthermore, students will study the literature on international assignments and the global mindset. In doing so, they will explore research on the emerging issues pertaining to international assignment types, the role of bi/multiculturals and cosmopolitans in global organizations, cross-cultural adjustment and culture shock, and gender and family in international assignments. Lastly, topics that have implications for human resource management practices in different cultures will be reviewed. By the end of the course students should gain not only mastery of the subject matter, but also develop knowledge creation capabilities and be able to identify, chart and eventually publish an original contribution. Thus, students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking and analytical skills, show creativity, and learn the effective use of written / verbal communications. As a means to that end, students will be required develop an original conceptual paper that would help fill a current void in the literature and be fitting for presentation at an academic conference.

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MGMT 896-996: Seminar in International Strategy

The ability to recognize the factors that influence an organization’s performance and to develop initiatives that enhance its long-run success is at the heart of strategic management. Whereas managers once were able to concentrate solely on their domestic strategy, firms now must adopt a global stance. The Seminar in International Strategy is designed to introduce students to the key elements of a global strategic orientation. The core idea of the course is to examine the ways in which economic globalization and a firm’s international presence has an impact upon its organization, processes, competitive advantage and business strategy. As such, the course covers a broad, although never complete, scope of key theories, trends, and phenomena that exist within the field of international strategy. Further, we examine the methods that are used to study international strategies.

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Mgmt 847/947: Research Development I

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an appreciation of the research process and the broader academic career. Through a series of workshops, lectures, and roundtable discussions, students will develop an understanding of the professional expectations of an academic career, including an appreciation for the academic culture that includes, among other things, critical review processes. Students will learn the central role of theory in the research process and they will start to develop the discipline of effective academic writing that they can apply to their Summer Research project. Students will begin the course by sharing their initial research interests. In workshop fashion, students will come to develop this research interest throughout the course.

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Mgmt 842/942: Consumer Behaviour I

This course seeks to enhance students' appreciation of the interdisciplinary and varied methodological nature of the field by providing an overview of issues concerned with "consumption," in a broad sense, as well as individual level consumer behavior, information processing and consumer decision-making. Topics include sociological and cultural influences on consumers, influences on how consumers interpret and respond to marketing phenomena, and psychological and psycho-social influences on consumer choice and decision processes.

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Mgmt 844/944: Consumer Culture Theory I

This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

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Mgmt 945: Quantitative Models for Marketing I

The course is designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM-I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate-level models while QMM-II focuses on consumer -level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM-I and QMM-II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual-level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

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MSc in Marketing

The Queen’s MSc in Marketing is designed for students wishing to pursue doctoral (PhD) studies and an academic career. In the program, students will establish a solid grounding in marketing strategy and management and consumer behaviour. They will also have the opportunity to conduct in-depth research into the area of marketing that is of most interest to them. Examples include branding, brand management, consumer persuasion, consumer fairness, consumer activism, and the impact and use of social media.

Acceptable Undergraduate degrees include, but are not limited to:

  • Business or Commerce
  • Sociology
  • Psychology
  • Economics
  • Anthropology
  • Engineering
  • Media/Cultural Studies
marketing video

Program Structure and Content

This is a 12-month program beginning in September. Each student is required to complete the following courses and a research project of publishable quality. Coursework completion consists of the following:

Year 1

Fall

Introduction to Research Methodology (MGMT 801)1.5
Experimental Research Method Design (MGMT 803)1.5
Statistics I (MGMT 800)3
Marketing Strategy & Management I (MGMT 840)1.5
Research Development I (MGMT 847)3
Consumer Behaviour I (MGMT 842)1.5

Winter

Survey Research Method Design (MGMT 804)1.5
Qualitative Research Method Design (MGMT 802)1.5
Consumer Culture
Theory I (MGMT 844)
1.5
Quantitative Models for Marketing I (MGMT 945)1.5

Summer

  • Major Research Project (MGMT 898)

Program Faculty


Dr.LaurenceAshworth

Dr. Laurence Ashworth, PhD

Associate Professor & Distinguished Faculty Fellow in Marketing
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Laurence Ashworth's research interests are broadly concerned with social and emotional influences on consumers'attitudes and decision making. He is interested in why these concerns are important to consumers and how they affect their choices. For example, he has examined how social concerns, such as the impression consumers attempt to create in front of other people, affect their decisions. He has also conducted research that has examined other social influences, such as fairness and suspicion, as well as research that has examined the direct influence of consumers’ emotions on choice.

Dr.JacobBrower

Dr. Jacob Brower, PhD

Assistant Professor
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Dr. Jacob Brower is an Assistant Professor of Marketing at Smith School of Business. His research interest include corporate reputation and brand management, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability. Specifically, his work examines the factors that drive corporate social performance (CSP) by firms, and how a firm's history of CSP impacts the payoffs from changes in its current CSP level. In a separate stream of research, he and his coauthors examine how consumers experience trade-offs between sustainability and functionality in products, and how firms can stimulate consumption of more sustainable products using this knowledge. His work has been presented at several national and international conferences, and has won the "best paper" award at the American Marketing Association's 2010 Marketing and Public Policy Conference.

Originally from the Syracuse, NY area, he completed his Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin in 2011, and also holds an M.S. in Marketing from the University of Texas at Austin, an M.A. in Economics from Syracuse University, and a B.A. in Economics at the State University of New York College at Geneseo. Prior to earning his Ph.D., he worked for several years as a consultant and market research analyst specializing in brand management and tracking for several Fortune 500 clients including FedEx, AT&T and IBM.

Dr.PeterDacin

Dr. Peter Dacin, PhD

Kraft Professor of Marketing
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Peter Dacin's research interests lie in consumer/managerial topic areas including consumer/managerial knowledge and judgement formation, brand equity/dilution, corporate associations, identity and reputation, consumption groups and brand communities, and research method and design. Linking behavioural research findings to marketing management issues is one of several themes in his research as is understanding the roles of individuals in consumption groups and the effects of these groups on consumption in general. He is currently the Kraft Professor of Marketing, the President-elect of the American Marketing Association Academic Council and is a co-founder of the Corporate Identity/Associations Research Group.

Dr.JayHandelman

Dr. Jay Handelman, PhD

Associate Dean (Faculty), Associate Professor and Distinguished Faculty Fellow of Marketing
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Jay Handelman's research centres on ways in which marketers integrate emotional, social, and cultural dimensions into their product/service and corporate branding strategies. This has led to areas of investigation that include the development of culture and emotion-based branding; the integration of corporate social responsibility into a corporation’s brand identity; and how marketers interact with not only consumers, but also a broader range of societal constituents such as consumer activists and NGOs.

Dr.CerenKolsarici

Dr. Ceren Kolsarici, PhD

Associate Professor & Ian R. Friendly Fellow of Marketing
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Ceren Kolsarci's research interests revolve around issues of market response to firms’ marketing activities such as, multi¬media IMC advertising and promotions through the use of advanced quantitative techniques such as Kalman Filters, Particle Filters, non¬parametric econometric methods and Bayesian estimation. Her research encompasses several questions, including: modeling simultaneous effects of multiple marketing activities; modeling temporal variations in the main and interaction effects; and investigating the influences of important external factors such as the intensity of competition, the amount of competitive marketing spending, and government induced industry specific regulations for promoting certain products to consumers. As a direct extension, she is also interested in efficiently forecasting the market response in a long enough horizon given firms'current marketing spending plans, as well as understanding how to optimally allocate the marketing budget.

Dr.MonicaLaBarge

Dr. Monica LaBarge, PhD

Assistant Professor in Marketing
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Dr. LaBarge was born in Ottawa, Ontario and earned a B.Comm. and a M.Sc. in Marketing at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and a Ph.D. in Marketing at the University of Oregon. Her work experience includes: Corel Corporation, Proctor & Gamble, Raid the North Adventure Racing, Hill & Knowlton and High Road Communications. Prior to returning to Queen's as an Assistant Professor of Marketing, she held the same position at the University of Montana.

Dr. LaBarge's research interests centre around public policy issues in marketing and how marketing can positively affect consumer well-being. Specifically, she has ongoing research projects in the areas of health promotion, charitable giving and non-profit marketing, as well as how vulnerable populations (such as older adults) cope with and overcome vulnerability in the marketplace. She is a frequent speaker on these topics to practitioner groups and media outlets including CBC Radio and Television, the National Post, CTV, Global TV, Huffington Post, and other news outlets across Canada.

Dr.NicoleRobitaille

Dr. Nicole Robitaille, PhD

Assistant Professor
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Nicole Robitaille's research interests lie in the areas of consumer behaviour and decision-making and their implications for policy. Specifically, her focus is on understanding how individuals make decisions and why they choose to engage in certain actions, and on discovering ways in which we can help them improve their decisions and behaviours. Within these areas, her interests are diverse, and she has focused on the following topics: moral decisions, financial decisions, temporal decisions, and health decisions.

Dr.Tandy DayleThomas

Dr. Tandy Dayle Thomas, PhD

Assistant Professor in Marketing
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Tandy Thomas’ research, encompassing a variety of methodological techniques (survey, experimental, and, predominately, interpretive methods), examines how the social contexts in which individuals are embedded impacts their consumption behaviors. Professor Thomas’ current projects explore how consumers engage in, and navigate through, marketplace-related identity work both collectively and individually. This work focuses on how consumers form identities within groups and across different media (e.g., pinterest), how consumers work together to build collective identities, and what this means for marketing practice. Relatedly, she also explores how consumers’ identity projects impact their responses to marketing actions, with a focus on advertising responses.