MGMT 801: Introduction to Research Methodology

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the context and traditions of knowledge generation in the social sciences in general, and academic business research in a business school context in particular. This course will encourage students to transcend the technical details of their respective research paradigms so as to position themselves as business school researchers capable of contributing meaningful knowledge to broader academic, business, and societal audiences. Guided by what it means to have a mindset of intellectual curiosity in the social sciences and business school context, this course will tackle questions such as, what it means to be driven by a scientific curiosity; how do we define or construct knowledge in academic business research and how does one's individual research contribute; what are the norms and traditions of being a valuable contributor of knowledge in academic business research? The goal of this course is to enable students to situate their current and forthcoming acquisition of in-depth skills in their research discipline into the mindset of researchers driven by intellectual curiosity seeking to contribute meaningful knowledge in the context and traditions of academic business research. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail.

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MGMT-993: Teaching Workshops and Practicum

Introduce graduate students to effective teaching techniques. These include traditional classroom-based teaching, case methods, research seminars. Effective job talks and career management issues will be covered. Classes require active participation by all students; in addition, opportunities to teach will be provided, followed by peer and professor feedback.

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Mgmt 890/990: Econometric Methods

This course covers selected topics in the empirical methods of cross-section and panel data analysis. Various econometric techniques are discussed in workshop format to help students interpret and critically evaluate empirical evidence. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects and application.

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Mgmt 820/920: Finance Theory

This course studies the theoretical foundations of the financial problems faced by individuals and firms under conditions of uncertainty. Contemporary theory is examined as it relates to portfolio selection by individuals, equilibrium market values of capital assets, the behaviour of capital asset prices and yields over time. (Crossed with ECON-870)

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Mgmt 821/921: Capital Markets, Theory and Empirics

This course covers the theory and empirics related to capital markets research and the pricing of assets. Possible topics include characteristics of financial asset returns, tests of market efficiency, asset pricing models, and market microstructure.

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MGMT-988: Applied Statistics and Econometrics

This course is an introduction to the statistical tools needed to test economic relationships. It is designed so that students can understand empirical research and execute independent research projects of their own. The course starts with a review of statistical inference; next it discusses the general linear regression model, and finishes with some advanced topics. Statistical software packages will be introduced and used throughout the course.

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Econ 850: Econometrics I

This course deals with the foundations of econometrics. Topics include the method of moments, the geometry of ordinary least squares, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals, bootstrap methods, nonlinear least squares, generalized least squares, and instrumental variables. If there is sufficient time, it may also deal with the generalized method of moments and the method of maximum likelihood. Intended for Ph.D. students.

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Mgmt 916: Special Topics

Specialized Topics in accounting research will be covered. The subject matter may vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and faculty.

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Mgmt 913: Introduction to Accounting Research - Markets

This course will provide an intensive introduction to principal themes in capital markets research in accounting.

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Mgmt 914: Introduction to Accounting Research - Experimental

This course will provide an intensive introduction to principal themes in experimental behavioral research.

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Mgmt 915: Introduction to Accounting Research - Field

This course will provide an intensive introduction to the principal themes in qualitative methodological research in accounting.

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Mgmt 910: Accounting I - Financial Accounting Research*

Elaborating on the themes in Introduction to Accounting Research Markets this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in financial accounting.

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Mgmt 911: Accounting II - Auditing Research*

Elaborating on the themes in Introduction to Accounting Research Experimental and Introduction to Accounting Research Field this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in auditing.

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Mgmt 912: Accounting III - Management Accounting Research*

Elaborating on the themes in the Introduction to Accounting Research Experimental and the Introduction to Accounting Research Field this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in management accounting.

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Mgmt 923: Advanced Asset Pricing

This course introduces the students to various topics on asset pricing in a continuous-time setting. The first part of the course covers contingent claim analysis and derivative pricing modeling, including their applications to other areas in finance. The second part of the course covers topics in optimal portfolio and consumption problems, equilibrium and intertemporal asset pricing models. Students should have had some previous exposure to microeconomics theory and some basic courses in financial derivatives. Strong backgrounds in calculus, linear algebra, and probability theory are recommended.

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Mgmt 910: Accounting I - Financial Accounting Research

Elaborating on the themes in Introduction to Accounting Research Markets this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in financial accounting.

Mgmt 911: Accounting II - Auditing Research

Elaborating on the themes in Introduction to Accounting Research Experimental and Introduction to Accounting Research Field this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in auditing.

Mgmt 912: Accounting III - Management Accounting Research

Elaborating on the themes in the Introduction to Accounting Research Experimental and the Introduction to Accounting Research Field this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in management accounting.

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Mgmt 882/982: Economics of Organizations

This course discusses elements of the economics of organizational design and decision processes. Using concepts and techniques from applied microeconomics, it provides an analysis of organizational form, structure, and boundaries. Examples are drawn from the literature to illustrate the theoretical concepts and to demonstrate how they can be used to predict organizational performance and aid in changing organizations effectively.

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Econ 810: Microeconomic Theory

This course provides an in depth review of theories of demand, production, general equilibrium, market failures and welfare economics. In addition, selected topics in decision theory and game theory will be covered.

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Econ 811: Advanced Microeconomic Theory I

This course provides a brief review of demand and production, general equilibrium and welfare economics. Topics such as core equivalence and efficient provision of public goods may be considered in depth. In addition, the course provides a substantial introduction to cooperative and non-cooperative game theory and its applications. Intended for Ph.D. students.

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Mgmt 885/985: Managerial Economics and Policy Seminar

This is a seminar course in which recent publications and studies will be used to highlight various key issues in managerial economics and policy. The specific topics covered may vary from year to year but will be representative of the major areas in which economics informs managerial decision-making.

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Mgmt 890/990: Econometric Methods

This course covers selected topics in the empirical methods of cross-section and panel data analysis. Various econometric techniques are discussed in workshop format to help students interpret and critically evaluate empirical evidence. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects and application.

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Econ 815: Macroeconomic Theory

The first half of this course discusses the computation of aggregate variables and introduces students to dynamic models of long-run growth: the Solow model, the neoclassical growth model, overlapping generations models, and endogenous growth models. These are used to study long-run policy issues and the determinants of cross-country differences in per capita income and growth. The second half of the course introduces the student to real business cycle models and to the micro-foundations of models of nominal rigidities and non-market clearing. These are used to study the nature of short-run fluctuations and to evaluate macroeconomic policies related to stabilization, inflation, unemployment and the public debt.

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Econ 816: Advanced Macroeconomic Theory I

This course will focus on fundamental tools of modern macroeconomic analysis. Specifically, recursive methods and their uses in stochastic applied general equilibrium theory. These uses include applications of both life-cycle and infinite horizon frameworks to savings and consumption, economic growth, fluctuations, and financial markets. Intended for Ph.D. students.

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Econ 813: Advanced Microeconomic Theory II

This course provides in depth coverage of current topics in microeconomic theory. Topics will be drawn from: general equilibrium with and without uncertainty; non-cooperative games; equilibrium concepts and refinements; applications of game theory to principal agent models and models of screening and signaling; correlated equilibrium; repeated games; cooperative games, bargaining, auctions, common knowledge, implementation, evolutionary games and theories of learning. Intended for Ph.D. students.

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Mgmt 822/922: Corporate Finance, Theory and Empirics

This course will develop an overall perspective of corporate financial decisions through an integrated coverage of the most important topics of corporate finance. Topics may include theory of the firm, capital structure, dividend policy, corporate governance, and corporate restructuring.

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Mgmt 924: Topics in Finance

This is a seminar course designed to expose students to aspects of finance not covered in detail in other courses in the program. Its aim is to integrate these topics into a broader understanding of the overall field of finance. Topics will vary from year to year depending on the interests and backgrounds of the students and the instructor(s); possible topics may include financial institutions, fixed income securities, corporate governance, and behavioural finance. Students are advised to contact the instructor each year for details of the course coverage.

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Mgmt 927: Directed Readings and Workshop

This course consists of two components, both of which are designed to introduce the student to the requirements of academic research in the field of finance. The first component, lasting the entire year, requires students to attend and actively participate in a seminar series with visiting speakers. Students will provide feedback and constructive criticism to the speaker on his or her work. The second component, to take place primarily in the winter semester, requires the student to work individually with a faculty member to produce a comprehensive review of the literature in their field of interest along with suggestions for future research opportunities. Topics are at the discretion of the faculty member.

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Mgmt 820/920: Finance Theory

This course studies the theoretical foundations of the financial problems faced by individuals and firms under conditions of uncertainty. Contemporary theory is examined as it relates to portfolio selection by individuals, equilibrium market values of capital assets, the behaviour of capital asset prices and yields over time.

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Econ 852: MA - Quantitative Methods

A first course in econometrics at the graduate level. Students are expected to have had at least one econometrics course at the undergraduate level, and to be familiar with matrix algebra and elementary statistics. A broad range of econometric models will be covered.

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Mgmt 803: Experimental Research Method Design

This course will teach the fundamentals of experimental design for the study of human behaviour including, but not limited to, experimental design considerations; assessment of reliability and validity; the equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with experimental design.

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Mgmt 804: Survey Research Method Design

This course will provide students with the foundations of survey (field) research method design. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, sample design, execution, and estimation; alternative sample designs and modes of data collection; the effect of question structure, wording, and context on respondent behaviour; the equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with the survey method.

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Mgmt 802: Qualitative Research Method Design

This course will provide students with the foundations of qualitative research techniques. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, observational field research, narratives, case histories, interviewing, principles of action research and grounded theory. The equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with the qualitative methods.

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Mgmt 800: Statistics I

Topics in this course may include, but are not limited to, univariate analysis, bivariate analysis, multiple linear regression, and analysis of variance.

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Mgmt 900: Statistics II

This course will be a continuation of Statistics I. Topics in this course may include, but are not limited to, categorical data analysis, multivariate linear regression, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, principal component analysis, factor analysis, cluster analysis, logistic regression, etc.

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Mgmt 870/970: Foundations of MIS I

This course begins to survey the major research areas in the field, including the design, implementation, use, and management of information systems within organizations. Its purpose is to expose students to the breadth of the field, by analyzing both the classic and current literature. For each area, we will examine the predominant theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, and analytical techniques.

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Mgmt 871/971: Foundations of MIS II

This course continues with the survey of major research areas begun in MGMT870. Again, for each area, we will examine the predominant theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, and analytical techniques. An emphasis will be placed on students developing their own research expertise and plans: students will learn how to design, conduct, evaluate, and present good research in the MIS area.

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MGMT-972: Advanced Topics in the Design, Development and Implementation of Information Systems

This course examines the development of information systems from the organizational, team and individual perspectives. Proprietary, inter-organizational and open domains of the development of business applications and IT architecture are covered. Topics include IS development practices, IS project management, IS maintenance, and IS sourcing with a focus on how individual characteristics, team dynamics, and organizational factors influence information systems design, development and implementation.

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Mgmt 973: Advanced Topics in Management Support Systems

This course examines research on management support systems. Management support systems is a major stream in information systems research covering such topics as decision support systems, group support systems, recommender systems for management, systems to support virtual teams, and knowledge management systems. The course explores the nature, role, and impacts of these systems on individuals and groups in the organization. Research in this area is diverse, covering a variety of theoretical bases, research methods, and reference discipline perspectives.

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MGMT-974* Advanced Topics in the Evaluation of Information Systems

This course examines current research on the impact of information technology on individual, group and organizational performance. It focuses on developing an understanding of how information technology (IT) changes both the processes and outcomes of work within an organization. At the individual level, topics include the impact of IT on employee work and productivity, the determinants of IT usage, and the influence of IT on decision-making. At the group level, topics include the influence of IT on group communication, social processes, and productivity in face-to-face and distributed settings. At the organizational level, topics involving the evaluation of IT investments and their impact on firm performance are examined. A variety of research perspectives drawing on methods from psychology, organization theory, strategy, economics, sociology and other disciplines are examined.

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Mgmt 975: Special Topics in MIS

Specialized topics in MIS research will be covered. The subject matter may vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and faculty.

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Mgmt 976: Emerging Topics in MIS

Emerging topics in MIS research will be covered. The subject matter may vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and faculty.

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Mgmt 860/960: Deterministic Operations Research Models

This course reviews and extends deterministic operations research model formulation, solution, and applications. Topics may include linear, non-linear, and integer programming, dynamic programming, spreadsheet modelling, network and transportation models, and project management models.

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Mgmt 861/961: Probabilistic Operations Research Models

This course reviews the formulation, solution, and application of a range of probabilistic modelling techniques. Topics may include inventory models, queueing, simulation, decision analysis, Markov models, forecasting, and stochastic dynamic programming.

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Mgmt 962: Stochastic Processes & Applications

This course provides a review of probability models and introduction to applied stochastic processes that are important in business settings. Topics may include Poisson processes, Markov chains, birth and death processes, random walk problems, elementary renewal theory, general; Markov processes, Brownian motion, and queuing theory.

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Mgmt 963: Advanced Topics in Optimization

This is a seminar designed to permit students to become familiar with the more advanced topics in mathematical programming. Topics covered will include: optimization theory, linear and non-linear programming, network theory, integer programming, and current research topics from the literature.

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Mgmt 965: Analysis of Supply Chain

In this course, we will explore modern analytical approaches to optimization in production and supply chain systems. Topics may include production and inventory control, process control, location analysis, and analysis of supply chains, including game-theoretic approaches.

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Mgmt 964: Advanced Topics in Operations Research

(offered alternate years)

This seminar will focus on topics of current interest in the field. Subjects may include combinatorial optimization methods, computational complexity, decision theory, operations management, revenue management, or others. The intention of the seminar is to bring students to the leading edge of research in the field, and extensive use of current journals will be made.

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Mgmt 840/940: Marketing Strategy and Management I

The Marketing Strategy and Management I and II seminars survey theories and frameworks associated with practice of marketing as seen through the eyes of academic researchers. Course readings focus on topics related to marketing strategy and marketing management. Marketing strategy consists of the knowledge, concepts and processes that allow firms to evolve and survive in a competitive environment including, the analysis of markets, the allocation of resources for the creation of superior customer value and the creation of a competitive advantage. Marketing management consists of those decision that translate strategic goals into market-based actions typically through implementing various elements of the marketing mix. In addition to the embodiment of a market/customer focus and the understanding and management of key relationships, the application of marketing strategy also ensures that an organization has the structure and processes that allow it to deliver superior benefits and respond in an appropriate and timely manner to change.

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Mgmt 842/942: Consumer Behaviour I

This course seeks to enhance students' appreciation of the interdisciplinary and varied methodological nature of the field by providing an overview of issues concerned with "consumption," in a broad sense, as well as individual level consumer behavior, information processing and consumer decision-making. Topics include sociological and cultural influences on consumers, influences on how consumers interpret and respond to marketing phenomena, and psychological and psycho-social influences on consumer choice and decision processes.

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Mgmt 843/943: Consumer Behaviour II

This course extends Consumer Behaviour I by expanding upon the key theoretical perspectives within the discipline of consumer behavior introduced in that course, as well as introducing additional areas of behavioural research not covered in CB I. In both seminars, the focus is on the applicability of behavioral theories and methodologies in the pursuit of a well-developed understanding of the consumption process.

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Mgmt 946: Marketing Topics III

Each year, a series of Marketing Topics courses will be offered that allow students to apply the foundational concepts they have learned in the Marketing Strategy and Consumer Behaviour courses to particular areas of specialization. Here is a sample of some of the Marketing Topics courses:

Mgmt 844/944 - Marketing and Society: This course will expose students to social, economic, environmental, political, and legal issues relevant to the study of markets and marketing activities, with particular emphasis placed on issues at the intersection of marketing, policy, and societal welfare. Course readings are drawn from marketing and related fields on topics broadly labeled as having to do with marketing and society issues, including public policy and marketing, transformative consumer research, social marketing, macromarketing, and sustainable consumption.

Mgmt 945 and Mgmt 948 - Quantitative Models for Marketing (QMM) I and II: The seminars, QMM‐I and QMM‐II, are particularly valuable for M.Sc. and Ph.D. students in Marketing or related disciplines (e.g. Business Economics, Operations Management) who are interested in model building and business analytics. The courses are designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM‐I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate‐level models while QMM‐II focuses on consumer‐level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM‐I and II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual‐level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

Mgmt 946 - Consumer Culture Theory: This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

Mgmt 947 - Advances in Marketing: Other topics courses will be available.

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Mgmt 841/941: Marketing Strategy and Management II

The Marketing Strategy and Management I and II seminars survey theories and frameworks associated with practice of marketing as seen through the eyes of academic researchers. Course readings focus on topics related to marketing strategy and marketing management. Marketing strategy consists of the knowledge, concepts and processes that allow firms to evolve and survive in a competitive environment including, the analysis of markets, the allocation of resources for the creation of superior customer value and the creation of a competitive advantage. Marketing management consists of those decision that translate strategic goals into market-based actions typically through implementing various elements of the marketing mix. In addition to the embodiment of a market/customer focus and the understanding and management of key relationships, the application of marketing strategy also ensures that an organization has the structure and processes that allow it to deliver superior benefits and respond in an appropriate and timely manner to change.

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Mgmt 844/944: Marketing Topics I

Each year, a series of Marketing Topics courses will be offered that allow students to apply the foundational concepts they have learned in the Marketing Strategy and Consumer Behaviour courses to particular areas of specialization. Here is a sample of some of the Marketing Topics courses:

Mgmt 844/944 - Marketing and Society: This course will expose students to social, economic, environmental, political, and legal issues relevant to the study of markets and marketing activities, with particular emphasis placed on issues at the intersection of marketing, policy, and societal welfare. Course readings are drawn from marketing and related fields on topics broadly labeled as having to do with marketing and society issues, including public policy and marketing, transformative consumer research, social marketing, macromarketing, and sustainable consumption.

Mgmt 945 and Mgmt 948 - Quantitative Models for Marketing (QMM) I and II: The seminars, QMM‐I and QMM‐II, are particularly valuable for M.Sc. and Ph.D. students in Marketing or related disciplines (e.g. Business Economics, Operations Management) who are interested in model building and business analytics. The courses are designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM‐I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate‐level models while QMM‐II focuses on consumer‐level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM‐I and II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual‐level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

Mgmt 946 - Consumer Culture Theory: This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

Mgmt 947 - Advances in Marketing: Other topics courses will be available.

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Mgmt 845: Marketing Topics II

Each year, a series of Marketing Topics courses will be offered that allow students to apply the foundational concepts they have learned in the Marketing Strategy and Consumer Behaviour courses to particular areas of specialization. Here is a sample of some of the Marketing Topics courses:

Mgmt 844/944 - Marketing and Society: This course will expose students to social, economic, environmental, political, and legal issues relevant to the study of markets and marketing activities, with particular emphasis placed on issues at the intersection of marketing, policy, and societal welfare. Course readings are drawn from marketing and related fields on topics broadly labeled as having to do with marketing and society issues, including public policy and marketing, transformative consumer research, social marketing, macromarketing, and sustainable consumption.

Mgmt 945 and Mgmt 948 - Quantitative Models for Marketing (QMM) I and II: The seminars, QMM‐I and QMM‐II, are particularly valuable for M.Sc. and Ph.D. students in Marketing or related disciplines (e.g. Business Economics, Operations Management) who are interested in model building and business analytics. The courses are designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM‐I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate‐level models while QMM‐II focuses on consumer‐level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM‐I and II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual‐level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

Mgmt 946 - Consumer Culture Theory: This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

Mgmt 947 - Advances in Marketing: Other topics courses will be available.

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Mgmt 947: Marketing Topics IV

Each year, a series of Marketing Topics courses will be offered that allow students to apply the foundational concepts they have learned in the Marketing Strategy and Consumer Behaviour courses to particular areas of specialization. Here is a sample of some of the Marketing Topics courses:

Mgmt 844/944 - Marketing and Society: This course will expose students to social, economic, environmental, political, and legal issues relevant to the study of markets and marketing activities, with particular emphasis placed on issues at the intersection of marketing, policy, and societal welfare. Course readings are drawn from marketing and related fields on topics broadly labeled as having to do with marketing and society issues, including public policy and marketing, transformative consumer research, social marketing, macromarketing, and sustainable consumption.

Mgmt 945 and Mgmt 948 - Quantitative Models for Marketing (QMM) I and II: The seminars, QMM‐I and QMM‐II, are particularly valuable for M.Sc. and Ph.D. students in Marketing or related disciplines (e.g. Business Economics, Operations Management) who are interested in model building and business analytics. The courses are designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM‐I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate‐level models while QMM‐II focuses on consumer‐level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM‐I and II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual‐level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

Mgmt 946 - Consumer Culture Theory: This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

Mgmt 947 - Advances in Marketing: Other topics courses will be available.

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Mgmt 850/950: Foundations of Research in Organizational Behaviour

The purpose of the course is to introduce you to the process of theory building in the field of organizational behaviour. The course examines several prominent theories in the field and explores recent evidence that assesses central claims made by the theory. The course also provides opportunities to develop skills in theory building.

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Mgmt 851/951: Seminar in Micro-Organizational Behaviour

The aim of this course is to examine the individual in the organization. Topics include work stress and workplace safety, organizational commitment, trust in management, organizational justice, aggression and violence in organizations, absenteeism, attendance and withdrawal from the organization, motivation, leadership, part-time employment, young workers, and job design.

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Mgmt 952: Advanced Topics in Organization Theory

This course analyses the development of, and contemporary directions in, the field of organization theory, with particular focus upon the relevance of organization theory to issues of economy and society. Drawing upon traditional and contemporary social theory as a backdrop, topics covered include scientific management, the human relations school, the Carnegie school, contingency analysis, labour process theory, resource dependence theory, the economic analysis of organizations, institutional theory, organizational demographics, and others.

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Mgmt 953: Seminar in Meso-Organizational Behaviour

This course introduces students to meso organizational behavior, which is concerned with the study of organizational phenomena that occur across more than one level of analysis (e.g., individual, group, organizational, national). Students will learn about multilevel theory and methodologies, with an emphasis on the emergence and functioning of collective constructs. The course will also provide coverage of numerous organizational behaviour topics that span levels, which may include person-environment fit, group and organizational climates, group diversity, group processes and performance, socially shared cognition, emotional contagion, and leaders' influence in social collectives.

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MGMT-954: Advanced Topics in Organizational Behaviour I

This course builds upon the material covered in foundational organizational behaviour Ph.D. courses, and provides students with an opportunity for in-depth coverage of selected advanced topics in organizational behaviour. The topics will vary yearly, but there will be an emphasis on the integration of research and theory, as well as enhancing students' research competencies throughout the course.

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Mgmt 956: Advanced Topics in Organizational Behaviour II

This course provides students with a second opportunity for in-depth coverage of selected advanced topics in organizational behaviour. The topics will vary yearly, but there will be an emphasis on the integration of research and theory, as well as enhancing students' research competencies throughout the course.

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Mgmt 957: Special Topic Reading Course in Organizational Behaviour

Specialized topics in management research will be covered. The subject matter will vary from year to year depending on the interests of the faculty.

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MGMT 923: Financial Economics

The objective of this course is to provide students with the rigorous theoretical foundations of modern financial economics. The course will cover the central themes of modern finance including individual investment decisions under uncertainty, stochastic dominance, mean variance analysis, arbitrage pricing theory, capital market equilibrium and asset valuation, risk neutral valuation, and incomplete markets. It will give a quick introduction to Ito calculus and its applications to derivative pricing, including options, futures, interest rates, and credit risks. After completing this course, the students should acquire a clear understanding of the major theoretical results concerning individuals’ consumption and portfolio decisions under uncertainty and their implications for the valuation of securities.

Prerequisites: Calculus, matrix algebra, and probability

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Mgmt 803: Experimental Research Method Design

This course will teach the fundamentals of experimental design for the study of human behaviour including, but not limited to, experimental design considerations; assessment of reliability and validity; the equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with experimental design.

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MGMT-905*/3: Entrepreneurship and Innovation

This seminar introduces you to theoretical and empirical literature in the domain of entrepreneurship. Research in entrepreneurship draws on a range of other disciplines. In this course the core discipline most frequently drawn upon in the assigned readings will be sociology (and its sub-domains of economic sociology and institutional theory) followed by economics. Theories drawn from psychology will be much less prominent. Following an introduction to entrepreneurship as a distinct field of research, each week will focus on a different stage of the entrepreneurial life cycle of a firm. Topics may include opportunity recognition, the process of innovation, institutional influences on entrepreneurship, the role that networks and social capital play in the development and growth of firms, corporate entrepreneurship, and entrepreneurial exit.

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MGMT-906*/3: Corporate Strategy Dynamics

This course examines corporate strategy dynamics, studying how firms scan the environment, gather information, and deal with information asymmetries; how firms perceive, interpret, and respond to environmental threats; and how firms transact under conditions of market failure. These dynamics will be studied in the context of organizational growth, acquisitions, reconfiguration, spatial evolution, strategic alliances, and divestiture. The course is expected to provide opportunities for students to develop and present research ideas in an emerging field. In addition, the course aims to contribute to student research efforts by (i) examining an emerging synthesis of existing theories that has application across domains, including innovation, CSR, governance, strategy process, international business, emerging market strategy, and institutional theory, and (ii) exploring the research process in complex empirical contexts.

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MGMT 805: History of Strategic Thought

This course provides a foundation in strategy and organizations by focusing on classic readings and approaches to the field of strategic management. The principal objective is to acquaint students with dominant ideas and a historical context for understanding the evolution of the field. The aim of the course will be to examine a number of perspectives, consider the strengths and weaknesses of each, and to look at the comparative ability of these models to explain a variety of organizational phenomena.

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MGMT 806: Strategy Process

This course provides an introduction to research on the process and practice of strategy making. The objective of the course is to survey major theoretical debates and empirical works that have considered the strategy making process from different conceptual perspectives and levels of analysis. Topics covered include the routines and tools supporting strategy practice, strategy emergence, strategy implementation and evolution, sensemaking and enactment of strategic change, strategy diffusion across organizations, and institutional and environmental influences on strategy making.

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MGMT 907: Contemporary Issues in Strategic Management

This course provides a comprehensive overview of theoretical models and empirical studies that address the fundamental questions in strategic management research: Why do firms perform differently? Why are firms different? How do firms behave? What are firms’ optimal boundaries? Each class will cover a different research stream within the strategic management field such as resource-based theory, knowledge-based view, behavioral theory of the firm, competitive dynamics, dynamic capabilities, alliance portfolios and networks, top management teams, real options theory and diversification strategy. Both seminal and more recent theoretical and empirical research will be discussed. The aim is to help students develop a mental model of the literature and to recognize interrelationships between different research streams. This course is intended for graduate students interested in conducting research in strategic management or related fields.

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Mgmt 847/947: Research Development I

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an appreciation of the research process and the broader academic career. Through a series of workshops, lectures, and roundtable discussions, students will develop an understanding of the professional expectations of an academic career, including an appreciation for the academic culture that includes, among other things, critical review processes. Students will learn the central role of theory in the research process and they will start to develop the discipline of effective academic writing that they can apply to their Summer Research project. Students will begin the course by sharing their initial research interests. In workshop fashion, students will come to develop this research interest throughout the course.

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Mgmt 844/944: Consumer Culture Theory I

This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

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Mgmt 846/946: Consumer Culture Theory II

This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

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Mgmt 945: Quantitative Models for Marketing I

The course is designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM-I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate-level models while QMM-II focuses on consumer -level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM-I and QMM-II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual-level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

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Mgmt 847/947: Research Development I

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an appreciation of the research process and the broader academic career. Through a series of workshops, lectures, and roundtable discussions, students will develop an understanding of the professional expectations of an academic career, including an appreciation for the academic culture that includes, among other things, critical review processes. Students will learn the central role of theory in the research process and they will start to develop the discipline of effective academic writing that they can apply to their Summer Research project. Students will begin the course by sharing their initial research interests. In workshop fashion, students will come to develop this research interest throughout the course.

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Mgmt 949: Research Development II

This course builds on the components of the first Research Development course. This course will commence in May which is immediately after the completion of the first course and right in the midst of students conducting their summer research projects. Therefore, the purpose of this course is to provide students with real time guidance as they are developing their summer project. The course also enables students to develop advanced level skills in critiquing their own (and other’s) research work, and advanced level skills at assembling a complete, high quality manuscript. Over the year of the course, students will develop an appreciation for the manuscript review process, and the timelines involved in this process.

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Mgmt 948: Quantitative Models for Marketing II

The course is designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM-I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate-level models while QMM-II focuses on consumer -level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM-I and QMM-II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual-level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

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Mgmt 840/940: Marketing Strategy and Management I

The Marketing Strategy and Management I and II seminars survey theories and frameworks associated with practice of marketing as seen through the eyes of academic researchers. Course readings focus on topics related to marketing strategy and marketing management. Marketing strategy consists of the knowledge, concepts and processes that allow firms to evolve and survive in a competitive environment including, the analysis of markets, the allocation of resources for the creation of superior customer value and the creation of a competitive advantage. Marketing management consists of those decision that translate strategic goals into market-based actions typically through implementing various elements of the marketing mix. In addition to the embodiment of a market/customer focus and the understanding and management of key relationships, the application of marketing strategy also ensures that an organization has the structure and processes that allow it to deliver superior benefits and respond in an appropriate and timely manner to change.

Mgmt 841/941: Marketing Strategy and Management II

The Marketing Strategy and Management I and II seminars survey theories and frameworks associated with practice of marketing as seen through the eyes of academic researchers. Course readings focus on topics related to marketing strategy and marketing management. Marketing strategy consists of the knowledge, concepts and processes that allow firms to evolve and survive in a competitive environment including, the analysis of markets, the allocation of resources for the creation of superior customer value and the creation of a competitive advantage. Marketing management consists of those decision that translate strategic goals into market-based actions typically through implementing various elements of the marketing mix. In addition to the embodiment of a market/customer focus and the understanding and management of key relationships, the application of marketing strategy also ensures that an organization has the structure and processes that allow it to deliver superior benefits and respond in an appropriate and timely manner to change.

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Mgmt 842/942: Consumer Behaviour I

This course seeks to enhance students' appreciation of the interdisciplinary and varied methodological nature of the field by providing an overview of issues concerned with "consumption," in a broad sense, as well as individual level consumer behavior, information processing and consumer decision-making. Topics include sociological and cultural influences on consumers, influences on how consumers interpret and respond to marketing phenomena, and psychological and psycho-social influences on consumer choice and decision processes.

Mgmt 843/943: Consumer Behaviour II

This course extends Consumer Behaviour I by expanding upon the key theoretical perspectives within the discipline of consumer behavior introduced in that course, as well as introducing additional areas of behavioural research not covered in CB I. In both seminars, the focus is on the applicability of behavioral theories and methodologies in the pursuit of a well-developed understanding of the consumption process.

×

Mgmt 847/947: Research Development I

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an appreciation of the research process and the broader academic career. Through a series of workshops, lectures, and roundtable discussions, students will develop an understanding of the professional expectations of an academic career, including an appreciation for the academic culture that includes, among other things, critical review processes. Students will learn the central role of theory in the research process and they will start to develop the discipline of effective academic writing that they can apply to their Summer Research project. Students will begin the course by sharing their initial research interests. In workshop fashion, students will come to develop this research interest throughout the course.

Mgmt 949: Research Development II

This course builds on the components of the first Research Development course. This course will commence in May which is immediately after the completion of the first course and right in the midst of students conducting their summer research projects. Therefore, the purpose of this course is to provide students with real time guidance as they are developing their summer project. The course also enables students to develop advanced level skills in critiquing their own (and other’s) research work, and advanced level skills at assembling a complete, high quality manuscript. Over the year of the course, students will develop an appreciation for the manuscript review process, and the timelines involved in this process.

×

Mgmt 844/944: Consumer Culture Theory I

This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

Mgmt 846/946: Consumer Culture Theory II

This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research.

×

Mgmt 945: Quantitative Models for Marketing I

The course is designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM-I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate-level models while QMM-II focuses on consumer -level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM-I and QMM-II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual-level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

Mgmt 948: Quantitative Models for Marketing II

The course is designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM-I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate-level models while QMM-II focuses on consumer -level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM-I and QMM-II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual-level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.

×

PhD in Finance

Program Course Summary

Common Core Courses

The common core represents that portion of the PhD program that is shared by all students across all area groups.

The purpose of the common core is for students to:

  • develop an understanding of the diversity of ways in which contributions to knowledge can be made in a business school through a breadth of methodologies, philosophies and perspectives
  • understand what it means to develop an academic career as a respected researcher, teacher, colleague, & mentor
  • gain a foundation for critical thinking skills

Curriculum Mapping

Year 2

Fall

Econometrics I (ECON 850)3
Directed Readings and Workshop I (MGMT 927)3
Elective3

Winter

Directed Readings and Workshop II6
Topics in Finance (MGMT 924)3
Advanced Macroeconomic Theory I (ECON 816)3

Summer

  • Present at Smith Grad Student Consortium (depends on comp structure)
  • Present Current Status of Thesis Proposal at Smith Grad Student Consortium
 

Program Faculty


Dr.PaulCalluzzo

Dr. Paul Calluzzo, PhD

Assistant Professor of Finance
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Paul Calluzzo’s research examines the role human interaction plays in financial decision making. His research interests are focused on institutional investors, corporate governance, mutual fund performance, and empirical asset pricing. Paul’s papers have been published in the Journal of Corporate Finance and the Journal of Banking and Finance.

Dr.PierreChaigneau

Dr. Pierre Chaigneau, PhD

Assistant Professor in Finance
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Pierre Chaigneau’s research interests include executive compensation, applied contract theory, financial economics, and financial stability. He obtained a PhD in Finance from the London School of Economics, where he is currently a research associate at the Financial Markets Group. His work has been presented at major conferences including the Western Finance Association, the Northern Finance Association, the Econometric Society Winter Meeting, and the Risk Theory Society. His papers are forthcoming or published in various journals, including the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis and the Journal of Finance.

Dr.SeanCleary

Dr. Sean Cleary, PhD

Bank of Montreal Professor in Finance
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Sean Cleary, CFA is the BMO Professor of Finance, Smith School of Business, Queen’s University. Dr. Cleary holds a Ph.D. in finance from the University of Toronto, as well as an MBA. He is a CFA charter holder, and is a former member of the Board of Directors for the Toronto CFA Society and the Atlantic Canada CFA Society (where he served as President). He is co-author of Introduction to Corporate Finance, first three editions, John Wiley & Sons Canada Limited, (2013, 2010, 2007), and is the Canadian author of the first three editions of the textbook, Investments: Analysis and Management, by W.S. Cleary and C.P. Jones, with John Wiley & Sons Canada Limited (1999, 2004, 2008). He is also the sole author of The Canadian Securities Exam Fast Track Study Guide, four editions - (2013, 2009, 2006, 2001), also published by John Wiley & Sons Canada Limited.

Dr. Cleary has published numerous research articles in various journals including the Journal of Finance, the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Financial Management, the Journal of Banking and Finance, the Journal of Financial Research, etc., with his publications having been cited over 1,700 times. He has received several major research grants totaling over $700,000. He is an Associate Editor for two finance journals and regularly serves as a reviewer for many of the top finance journals. Sean serves regularly as an expert financial consultant, and frequently appears in the media on television, on the radio and in the newspapers.

Dr.EvanDudley

Dr. Evan Dudley, PhD

Assistant Professor of Finance
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Evan Dudley’s research interests are in corporate finance with a focus on the capital-raising process and firms’ capital structures. He obtained a PhD in finance from the University of Rochester and is a former faculty member of the University of Florida. His work has been published in the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, the Journal of Corporate Finance, Financial Management, and the Journal of Law and Economics.

Dr.LouisGagnon

Dr. Louis Gagnon, PhD

Professor and distinguished Faculty Fellow in Finance
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Louis Gagnon's research interests lie at the intersection of international corporate finance, investments, and risk management. His current research examines factors hindering arbitrage activity in the market for cross-listed securities and their implications for capital market integration, the dynamic relation between trading volume and market co-movements, and the interaction between corporate investment, financing, and risk management decisions.

Dr.LewisJohnson

Dr. Lewis Johnson, PhD

Professor Emeritus in Finance
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Lew Johnson's research interests focus on investments and portfolio management and on financial system governance and regulation. He has written numerous theoretical and empirical papers on stock and bond valuation, duration analysis, investor behaviour, mutual fund performance, and financial system organization. Recent work has centred on the valuation of technology stocks, in which he has conducted several empirical and theoretical analyses of the technology stock bubble, employing contingent claims and real options theories.

Dr.FabioMoneta

Dr. Fabio Moneta, PhD

Assistant Professor in Finance
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Fabio Moneta’s research interests concentrate on investments, institutional investors, mutual fund performance, and empirical asset pricing. He is also interested in monetary policy topics to which he was exposed while working at the European Central Bank in Frankfurt. He has published articles on mutual fund performance, forecasting, and international business cycle synchronization in a variety of journals. He has presented his research at the American Finance Association and the European Finance Association meetings, as well as other conferences and universities in Europe and North America. He has acted as a referee for several academic publication outlets and has been teaching undergraduate and PhD courses on corporate finance, investments, and empirical asset pricing.

Dr.EdwinNeave

Dr. Edwin Neave, PhD

Professor Emeritus in Finance
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Ted Neave's research focuses on both theoretical and practical finance. On the theoretical side, he studies financial economics and asset pricing, especially options pricing. On the practical side he analyzes financial systems and financial regulation. He has reported both his theoretical and his practical work in numerous articles and books. In addition, his programs in banking education are currently used in more than forty countries.

Dr.LynnettePurda

Dr. Lynnette Purda, PhD

Associate Professor and RBC Fellow in Finance
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Lynnette Purda conducts empirical research in corporate finance with a particular focus on the area of corporate governance. Much of her work has examined potential monitors of firm behaviour including internal monitors such as the board of directors and external monitors such as credit rating agencies and regulators. Dr. Purda’s work is frequently interdisciplinary in nature, and has combined the study of finance with law, international business, and accounting. Current research topics include corporate fraud and agency problems among different classes of debtholders.

Dr.RyanRiordan

Dr. Ryan Riordan, PhD

Associate Professor & Distinguished Faculty Fellow of Finance
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Ryan Riordan looks at how investors and exchanges use high-frequency trading systems and the impact of these systems on the quality of financial markets. Too much technology, or its misapplication, can result in markets that are unstable and expensive to trade in. Not enough technology can mean investors do not meet their investment targets. He is also looking at a broader question: Is faster price discovery better for markets? He is exploring the impact of ever faster price discovery on other important market factors, such as liquidity, short-term volatility, and long-term price discovery and efficiency. 

Dr.FatmaSonmez

Dr. Fatma Sonmez, PhD

Assistant Professor in Finance
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Fatma Sonmez's an Assistant Professor of Finance at Smith School of Business. She received her PhD in Finance from the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. She also holds an MSc in Mathematics as well as an MSc in Engineering Management-Industrial Engineering both from M.E.T.U (Ankara, Turkey) and a BA in Mathematics. Her main research interests are in empirical asset pricing with a primary focus on stock market volatility and how it affects security prices. Her recent research has looked at the impact of share price and institutional trading on volatility. She has presented her research at a variety of good academic conferences around the world and won several best paper awards. She also has an active research interest on the impact of stock market participation and population aging on financial markets. She mainly teaches investments and empirical finance courses. She has published articles in finance and mathematics journals.

Dr.WulinSuo

Dr. Wulin Suo, PhD

Associate Professor in Finance
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Wulin Suo's research focuses on valuation and hedging of derivative securities, particularly instruments involving the term structure of interest rates. His research interests also include risk management, credit risk modeling, computational finance, and mathematical finance. He is currently working on problems related to the performance of various derivative pricing models and the application of option pricing theory to other areas of finance.

Dr.SelimTopaloglu

Dr. Selim Topaloglu, PhD

Associate Professor and RBC Fellow in Finance
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Selim Topaloglu's research focuses on trading behaviour of individuals and institutions, analyst behaviour, insider trading and initial public offerings. Current research topics include: the effects of regulation fair disclosure on institutional and insider trading, the secondary market activity for NASDAQ IPOs, and investor behaviour over the rise and fall of the NASDAQ stock market.

Dr.WeiWang

Dr. Wei Wang, PhD

Associate Professor & Distinguished Faculty Fellow of Finance
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My research interests are in bankruptcy restructuring, distressed investing, corporate governance, activist investors, capital structure, and behavioral finance. My research has been published in the Journal of Finance, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Financial Management, and the Journal of Fixed Income, and featured in various media including the Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones Newswires, South China Morning Post, The Globe and Mail, National Post, and Business Week.

Current Students


StudentAreas of interestSupervisorContact
Matthew BolandCorporate finance, alternative assets, experimental economics and behavioural financeLynnette PurdaEmail
Paul DionBehavioural & quantitative financeLynnette PurdaEmail
Line DrapeauLouis GagnonEmail
Tashfeen Hussain Corporate financeLynnette PurdaEmail
Zheng LiuEvan Dudley
Xiaobing MaCorporate finance and credit riskLewis Johnson
Shu Zhang Corporate FinanceWei Wang