QSB Commerce students raise over $10,000 in holiday gifts for the Children’s Aid Society

Posted on December 07, 2009

Commerce students Spenser Heard (far left) and Adam Mitchell (far right) with representatives from the Children’s Aid Society of Kingston
Commerce students Spenser Heard (far left) and Adam Mitchell (far right) with representatives from the Children’s Aid Society of Kingston

The Holiday Hope campaign came to an end this weekend, with a farewell from the Children’s Aid Society as they drove away with gifts for 52 families to be distributed this holiday season. The campaign enticed countless Queen’s School of Business Commerce students to give something back to the Kingston community, and in a way that was both meaningful and heart-warming. The campaign successfully raised over $10,000 in the form of holiday gifts, that will be received by over 150 underprivileged children across Kingston.

The campaign was the brain child of Adam Mitchell (Comm’11) and Spenser Heard (Comm’10, Comsoc President). Groups of students signed up to sponsor a family of children, and through a partnership with the Children’s Aid Society, were provided with a holiday wish list. The groups were given a $100 starting fund covered by the generous donations from the Queen’s Commerce Society, the Queen’s School of Business, the NetImpact Support Centre, and Oil Thigh Designs. The expectation was for student groups to match this offering, but many well exceeded it.

Dean David Saunders addressed those gathered for the event, drawing to light the many things that Commerce students do to give back to the community. At the finale in the Goodes Hall Atrium, a holiday tree was almost completely masked by the hundreds of wrapped gifts that surrounded it. A representative from the Children’s Aid Society gave a heart-warming thank you to everyone, and made it clear just how important these gifts would be this holiday season, leaving a long-lasting impression on the students who worked so hard to make the idea a reality.


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