The Monieson Centre for Business Research

The Monieson Centre for Business Research was established in 2000 by Mel Goodes in recognition of Professor Danny Monieson’s academic career at Queen’s University. Professor Monieson was driven by the desire to produce rigorous academic research that advances our thinking about business practice. Inspired by this legacy, the Monieson Centre funds collaborative faculty initiatives, driven by rigorous academic research that forms the foundation for usable knowledge that impacts our thinking about business issues of contemporary importance.

At present, the Monieson Centre supports three collaborative research initiatives which help to establish Smith School of Business expertise in the following domains of business research.

The Monieson Centre for Business Research

Mel Goodes and Professor Danny Monieson.

Research Initiatives

Disruptive Technologies & Financial Innovation

Disruptive Technologies & Financial Innovation

Ryan Riordan, Elspeth Murray, Evan Dudley

This research group aims to investigate the effect of disruptive technology on Finance. The focus of the grant is on the “disintermediation” of finance through technological innovation. Specifically, the Collaborative Grant will study how technology can change the process by which borrowers and lenders (and savers and consumers) are matched through financial markets.

The research group will seek to answer important questions such as: does technology make this process more transparent, or do a select few benefit at the expense of the many? The Grant will be used to establish the infrastructure of a virtual data center that will enhance collaboration through data sharing between both internal and external researchers.

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Crowds & Organizations

Crowds & Organizations

Jean-Baptiste Litrico and Matthias Spitzmuller

An important byproduct of the widespread use of social media and communication technologies has been the rising exposure of organizations to multiple audiences, which include not just their customers but also proximate and more distal publics. While recent research has brought light on the sources of organized contention faced by organizations, we know comparatively much less about the role played by audiences in the creation of organizational purpose.

This research group will focus on the interactive creation of meaning and organizational purpose between organizations and their audiences, by addressing the following questions: How are organizational audiences created? How do organizations influence or manage the process of audience formation? How do organizations develop a shared sense of purpose in interaction with their multiple audiences in society?

Growing Up Poor & Leadership

Growing Up Poor & Leadership

Julian Barling, Nick Turner, Julie Weatherhead (PhD Student)

Scholars have spent decades trying to expand our understanding of leadership, mostly by asking minor variations of the same old questions, an approach that lessens the likelihood that new knowledge is created. This research group seeks to redress this by asking new questions about leadership, specifically if and how growing up in poverty influences later leadership. Specific questions that will be addressed include: How does early childhood poverty influence who becomes a leader? How does exposure to early childhood poverty influence the type and quality of leadership behaviors once assuming a leadership position? Can we enhance the motivation to lead among late adolescents reared in poverty? Can we reduce implicit negative stereotypes and biases held by leadership selection committees that disadvantage lower SES applicants?